We’ve Met the Enemy and He is All of Us (Take 2) – Why All Ed Reform Fails

This is a post about leadership.  Not the mechanics of leadership but the need for leadership… real leadership.  Not the kind of leadership that marshals support for doing the wrong things better. No, the kind of leadership that has the courage to confront the need for doing the right thing.  We are not doing  the right thing with education and we haven’t been for a while now.  We been doing the wrong thing and we’ve been allowing the wrong people to tell what to do.

I’m going to share a picture. My picture is not optimistic.  You can decide whether or not that picture matches your own sense of our future.  My picture is one where our system of public education is under assault and where it is  not responding well to the challenges facing it. My picture is about our continued backwards march into the future.  It’s a picture summed up by Danny DiVito’s character in the film “Other People’s Money “.  DiVito is speaking to his audience of disgruntled employees whose factory, unresponsive to changing markets, is about to be taken over by a larger company. They are proud of what they produce but startled into silence when he tells them, “I’ll bet the last manufacturer of buggy whips made their best damn buggy whip on the day they closed.”

My post is about leadership because we are faced with the buggy whip dilemma. We have remained unresponsive to market needs and conditions.

That’s no surprise. Who knew we were supposed to?  We can’t be blamed for not responding to something we didn’t know we were supposed to respond to.  But we know it now.  And we continue to act as if we don’t.  More important than market needs and conditions, we remain deaf to the messages being sent to us by the consumers of our work… the kids. We remain deaf to the declining engagement levels of our kids in schools… a decline which has less than 50% of our kids reporting that they are disengaged in school by 11thgrade.  We remain deaf to record levels of reported stress, anxiety, depression and teen suicides.  Sure we may read about such statistics and express our concern about the impact of “screen time”, the negative effects of technology, and the almost unbelievable levels of school violence.  But rarely do we look at “our own house” to see what school practices, policies, procedures, etc. might be significant contributors to these trends.

We continue to prepare our students according to a story which is dying, if not already dead.  What story is dead?  It’s the story of the American Dream that deals with education. There are stories of other aspects of the Dream that many would also consider dead but I’ll leave those stories to other chroniclers of our history.

Context for A Dying Story –

Most of us have grown up within a story that shared with us a life plan which included the following admonitions:

  • Go to school
  • Work hard
  • Get good grades
  • Do well on the SAT/ACT’s
  • Get into a good college
  • Graduate
  • Get a good job
  • Be secure for life

If this story is still accurate why is it that the largest job growth segment in our society is now the so-called “gig-economy” – the economy based on the growth of independent contract workers – workers, moving on demand,  from “gig” to “gig”? Workers without pension.  Workers without job security. Workers whose productivity has grown while their wages have remained stagnant. Workers, if college grads, with significant piles of student debt.

A  recent study  completed by LinkedIn  (U.S. Emerging Job Report… Forbes, December 13, 2018) lists “The Top Five In-Demand Skills” (Biggest Skills Gap).  The report listed:

  1. Oral Communications
  2. People Management
  3. Social Media
  4. Development Tools
  5. Business Management

Are we seeing many learning experiences for kids in our public school system intentionally designed to grow these skills?  No, you say… but some of these are college level skills. Well, here’s some additional context about college.

It comes via another story which also appeared today, also in Forbes, which asks the question, “Will Half Of All Colleges Really Close In The Next Decade?”. The author of the quote is Clayton Christiensen, best-known for his work in disruptive innovation.  In an earlier, more measured description of the situation, Christiensen suggested that there are a host of colleges and universities that are struggling financially.  Of these the bottom 25% will disappear or merge with in the next 10-15 years (article written 5 years ago).

And here’s how we’ve responded.  Take a couple of minutes and look at the two clips I’ve included here.  The first parallels the findings reported in a recent Gallup survey which looked at the engagement of levels of students as they moved through school.  The engagement levels dropped from roughly 80% in grade 3 to about 40% in grade 11.  Those of us working in schools or who have children in schools don’t need to see these numbers to know he drop off is significant.  I’ve heard lots of explanations about this phenomenon, “Kids just don’t seem to care.” or ”They’re not interested in learning.” or  “They just want to play on the Smart Phones.”  or “Kids just aren’t as responsible any more.” or  “Our absentee rate is a real problem.”  or “It’s the damned state tests. School’s no fun for them anymore.”

What I haven’t heard much of is “I wonder what we’re doing to promote this loss of engagement.”  or “What adult behaviors discourage curiosity?” or…

Take a look at “The Power of Questions” 

This next clip is entitled “I Just Sued The School System”. It’s a bit (!) more hyperbolic.  It’s produced by Ted Dintersmith, author of What School Could Be. Hyperbole aside, can you find some truths? While I’m not a great fan of Dintersmith’s solutions, it’s hard to argue with what he saw as he visited 200 schools in 50 states, observing instruction, interviewing kids and educators. This clip dramatizes his findings.

Here is a comment offered by a teacher in response to seeing the clip.

Comment from “I Just Sued the School System!!!”

My 5th grade teacher and I had a debate on the school system and he said “I have my opinion but I’ll be more then happy of you could change my mind”, I then ask to used YouTube for a video and he said yes, so I turned on the smartboard, hooked up the computer, and played this video. By the end of it he was in tears and said ” Well then congratulations Kiley, you’ve changed my mind, maybe one day you’ll change the system yourself”, he was my favorite teacher, still is.

Unspoken in the comment shared above, is the message, “Maybe one day you’ll change the system yourself.” (italics mine).  The implication is clear… Maybe you’ll change the system. I can’t. I can’t try. I won’t. I won’t try.

This is where leadership fits…

This is a critical moment in a series of critical moments.  Some have described the events of the past 18-24 months as a battle for the soul of our nation. While not every one might agree with that assessment, it’s hard not to recognize these times as different than anything most of us have experienced.

But what if there is another battle going on?  And what if that battle touches each of us who has committed to working as educators.  It’s a battle for the soul of our kids. And what if, consistent with our history of identifying problems inaccurately, we have identified the problem as which schools our kids can/should attend (charters, academies, “regular” public schools), which schools we should fund (public, private, charters, on-line) and how should we fund schools (vouchers, educational savings accounts, local taxation)? What if these are good questions if the issue were actuallywhich schools should our kids attend? What if the real question is not whichschool but whyschool? What if the real question to be addressed is what is the purpose of education today in 2019? Is it the same as it was when schools were originally configured and curricula were original organized (1890’s)?

And so leadership…

What if leadership can no longer be focused on “school” leadership? What if leadership is about creating emotionally safe places where we and our teacher colleagues can explore the differences between schooling and learning? What if leadership is exploring for ourselves the extent to which the story of school and schooling is no longer valid? What if leadership is challenging our fellow educators, members of our school communities, members of the boards of education to explore the possibility that the old story of school is dead? What if leadership is helping people unlearn their old story beliefs about schools and schooling – that learning that matters takes place in a school, that school is defined as a building, that that adults impart knowledge to students?

What? But wait!  Am I saying that leadership means that we have to explore with teachers that their role (the role they grew up experiencing as students and the role they have tried to perfect as educators) has to change and may require a very different set of skills? That we have to align the experiences that our kids have with a new purpose… a purpose beyond preparation for testing hurdles and credit accumulation? A purpose that is no longer the mastery of content defined over a century ago?   A purpose that doesn’t designate schools as the only place where meaningful learning can take place?

This is a time for New Year’s Resolutions.  Thinking of my teaching or my district, I always found these relatively meaningless in January.  I made my new year’s resolutions in the summer in preparation for beginning my new year.  But what if we used the time right now to make one resolution about creating a safe space for kids and teachers in our classroom, school, or district to take risks about learning? What is we used the time right now to explore what policies, practices, procedures we have that might contribute to student stress, anxiety, and depression? What if you filled in the blank with the commitment to explore the conflict between what you believe about student learning and the practices in your classroom, school, or district?

Maybe you could complete the following, “Couldn’t I at least….?

 

Finding What Matters… time to check for true north

compassI have a lot to say. You wouldn’t know it from the time between posts, but I do.  I even made a list and discussed with a good friend which one I should post first.  But still I postponed it.  I’m not usually a procrastinator. There were just too many ideas that, although related, didn’t seem to share a common focus.  If the jumble of ideas left me confused, it was unlikely that readers would be able to sense any unifying elements.

And then I encountered a timely essay, penned by Jon Kabat-Zinn entitled “The Total Incompatibility of Mindfulness and Busyness”. One of his highlighted quotes spoke directly to me.

When we set things up to make any balance in our lives a virtual impossibility, we are evincing disloyalty to what we value most.

On the same day I received a notice from the Modern Learners Team asking us to react to op ed written by Peter DeWitt that appeared recently in EdWeek. In his piece DeWitt suggested “12 Areas School Leaders Should Focus On in 2019”.  Only 12? Talk about the impossibility of finding balance!

I smiled a bit at my contrasting images.  On the one hand, there was Peter DeWitt juggling 12 balls, each labeled with a different area demanding his attention.  On the other, there was the image of Jon sitting cross-legged in a serene yoga pose engaged in the practice of quiet mindfulness.  In my imagination, I was right there with Peter juggling a list of 12 competing themes for my next blog piece, looking longingly at Jon peacefully reflecting on ways he could simplify his life and reject self-imposed busyness.

And then came Oprah to the rescue.  Yup, Oprah.

Actually Oprah didn’t make a personal appearance, rather she showed up at the request of my wife’s suggestion (!) that I read the transcript of Oprah’s interview with Michelle Obama. The interview was scheduled to help promote the release of the First Lady’s memoir, Becoming.

Oprah had me at the first question, Why Becoming?. Michelle had me with her answer…

A question that adults ask kids – I think it’s the worst question in the world – is “What do you want to be when you grow up?” As if growing up is finite. As if you become something and that’s all there is.

I realized that all of the items on my topic list dealt in some way with becoming… becoming who we want to be, becoming what our schools might be, becoming what learning is all about, helping our kids become more than a test score, and helping our kids learn how to be in the world they are experiencing.

If you’re reading this and working in schools, regardless of position you can identify with the image of juggling too many balls.  These balls may be in the form of new or revised standards, new safety/security protocols, new professional evaluation systems, new or increasing focus on “personalized Learning”, new graduation requirements, etc. Hardly a climate suited to peaceful reflection and cross legged yoga positions.  And, by the way, it’s no different for kids.

You might recall my previous reference to a film entitled Eighth Grade.  In that film the young girl who is the focus of the film discusses that each day she is faced with deciding who to be. Who to be with her friends during school? After school? Who to be with her dad while she rides with him in the car? Who to be on social media?  She goes to bed late. Gets up early. Decides what to wear.  Wonders if she’ll see her friends? If they’ll still be her friends? She goes to soccer, participates in drama, has part-time job.  12 balls in the air seems like a piece of cake.

How do we escape the seemingly endless demand to juggle too many “have to’s” or “shoulds”? Years ago, I happened on a book edited by Art Costa, James A. Bellanca, Robin Fogarty. It was entitled, If Minds Matterand posed the question, “If minds really mattered, would school look like it does?”  Would we group kids by age? Would they all have to read by the end of third grade? Would we still focus so much on compliance and efficiency? Would we continue to organize high school content according to the thinking of the Committee of Ten in 1892? (Yes, we still do.) Would we continue to place most of our emphasis on learning that occurs within the walls of a school building?

So, as adults, let’s forget the 12 balls for a bit. Let’s forget the constant introduction of new initiatives, the pressure imposed primarily by the focus on the needs of adults.  Let’s just answer one question?  What matters?  What matters to you? How do we help kids learn/decide what matters?

What would happen if we created space where answering this question was the thing that mattered? For us? For kids?  What would the design of learning look like if it were based solely on the answer to ‘what matters’?  What would your answer to this question be?  What if Aldrich is right and the only thing that matters for our kids is that they learn how to learn, learn how to do, and learn how to be? What if you took 15 minutes or so and just wrote down what matters to you as an educator? What if you then looked at what you (or your school) is doing to make your “what matters” a reality?

Reimagining, not reforming. Are we saddened and embarrassed enough to do something?

Pittsburgh Screen Shot 2018-10-31 at 11.15.30 AMCNN bomb Screen Shot 2018-10-31 at 11.20.47 AM

Kroger shooting Screen Shot 2018-10-31 at 11.18.08 AM

The recent events in our nation have occupied most of my intellectual and emotional energy. Mired in attempts to find sense in the senseless, I simply had nothing that seemed worth sharing.  Added to this, I felt constrained by advice I frequently heard a kid as (and apparently internalized)… “Never talk about religion or politics” if you want maintain relationships.

Watching our national “dialog” spiral downwards, I began to recognize that as really bad advice. I began to realize that it is precisely our inability to discuss such emotion-laden topics from a perspective of understanding rather than one of winning that is causal in our current disconnected and increasingly tribal response to “the other”.  And perhaps more importantly, it is precisely we as educators who have the opportunity to turn this around.  Certainly not by ourselves and certainly not overnight, but we have the opportunity.  I believe we also have the responsibility.

But I was struggling to express this. And then I received a posting of a piece piece on the Modern Learners site entitled “Designing for Learning” that broke the logjam.  It’s a fascinating piece about the implications of design thinking and references an even more fascinating video clip about schooling.  I urge you to read the post and to take time to view the clip.  I’ll buy you a beer if you think it was a waste of your time.

Design Thinking… What Is It?

The concept of Design Thinking has achieved educational jargon status.  Google reports that a search on the term “design thinking” yielded about 1,350,000,000 results.  Here’s a definition from Interaction Design. Interaction-Design 

Design Thinking is an iterative process in which we seek to understand the user, challenge assumptions, and redefine problems in an attempt to identify alternative strategies and solutions that might not be instantly apparent with our initial level of understanding. At the same time, Design Thinking provides a solution-based approach to solving problems. It is a way of thinking and working as well as a collection of hands-on methods.

What stands out to you in this definition? For me, key terms here are seek to understand the user, challenge assumptions, and alternative strategies.  Hence, in exploring the notion of ‘designing for learning’, key pieces would be

  • understanding the learner,
  • challenging assumptions about schooling and learning, and
  • exploring alternative strategiesfor where and how learning can occur.

So what would this look like? 

First of all, it would look different. I want to tackle just a couple of differences here.They’re big and scary.

As I have shared here in previous posts and as is reported in numerous studies, the design of our schools and the schooling process is inconsistent with what we know about user learning.  In Will’s post, he notes

If we were really intent on improving learning inside the school walls, we would pay a lot more attention to how learning happens outside the school walls in the natural world and then build our practice based on that. So, at the risk of being repetitive, we know that outside of school kids learn with other kids and adults of all different ages. We know that they don’t learn in 45-minute chunks. We know that learning occurs without any contrived tests.

But what would happen if we didn’t think of schools as the point of delivery for learning?  Why, when we consider looking at how kids (and adults) learn in the world outside of school, would we not feel the need to change schools to reflect this?  Why wouldn’t we re-design schools into places where “real world” learning could be coordinated rather than delivered?  Why wouldn’t we promote the conversion of schools to centers for community learning?… places where learning could be supported, not controlled… places where resources for learning, both human and material, could be housed to supplement those found outside/beyond the walls of the school?

I know all of the practical, adult centered, logistical reasons why this can’t happen (OMG, what about the child care, custodial function, what would I do with 50 “You Tubers”? What if they didn’t want to learn Algebra?, etc. ). I see such thinking as simply an extension of a system that supports chunking learning into 45 minutes segments for the sake of efficiency and adult convenience.

Just as the Industrial Revolution spawned the creation of schools (and schooling as we have experienced it), is it not possible for the Technological Revolution to redefine that model to reflect not only the availability of learning resources and learning experiences, but also the places in which learning can take place and be recognized?

We have the beginnings of such user-designed places in urban community schools… places where the intellectual, social-emotional, and health needs of the learners can be coordinated and extended. Why not elsewhere?  If we are going to “design for learning” why would we continue to use an industrial model for the spaces and ways in which learning can take place?

And speaking of learning… Learn what?

Will continues his piece with the question about what our kids should learn, “What Do We Want Our Children to Be?”  What would happen if we asked the question “HOW would we like our kids to be?” instead of “WHAT would we like them to be?” I suspect that, from the extended description in the piece, the intent may well have been to mean “how” while using the term “what”; however, I think that precision in language is critical to help us avoid multiple definitions and multiple directions/solutions.

Remember back at the beginning I shared that one of the lessons learned in our previous story was to avoid topics of politics and religion.  This advice was based on experiences where such discussions went poorly.  So avoiding them became to be the favored response.  But there was and is another response… a response that forges connections rather than separation.

It’s empathy.

Empathy is the path beyond separation and is directly related to my reasoning for suggesting a focus on how we want our kids to be, rather than what they should be.  Does anyone else notice that we, uniquely, among rich, industrialized countries, have embraced a language of violence?  We fight “wars” on drugs, “wars” on illiteracy, “wars” on poverty and tragically ironically, “wars” on violence.  We define money raised by politicians for their campaign a “war chest”. We see such words as “American” as proud, strong, powerful and words such as “empathy” as soft, weak, and, in a patriarchal society, an even worse adjective… “feminine”.

It appears that suggesting how they should be as empathetic is seen by many as a rejection of the American story of competition, toughness, and hard work. There is a growing sense that this story should be rejected.  The acceptance of that story has created a culture of needing more, and needing more too frequently comes at the expense of others.  It creates and reinforces a sense of scarcity… a sense that whatever someone else gets is reducing what’s available for me. It results is sum-zero thinking.  I must win.  A natural consequence of winners is the reciprocal, losers. We have become a win-lose culture, not only in the acquisition of material wealth but also in the course discussion.  Prized are the winners, losers not so much.

We cannot continue to avoid the topics which divide us.  We cannot continue to “discuss” such issues while focusing more on winning the “debate” than on understanding what it is like to be the other person and how being that person has led them to conclusions/beliefs that differ from our own.

How does this change?  It changes with us as educators, as school leaders, as teachers, as members of our education community.  It changes with parents.  It changes with a generation of young people we are charged with preparing for what appears to be an increasingly precarious time. It changes by helping our kids encounter the world around them as it really exists, not as it exists inside the walls of a school building, not as it exists in programs that were designed for another time and a very different set of needs, not in programs designed by large publishing houses seeking their share of a lucrative education market place.  It changes with creating the habit of civil, empathetic discourse and discussion.  It continues with the creation and nurturing of a culture that rejects violence as the response to differences in thinking. It changes with the rejection of demonizing and vilifying those whose skin color or beliefs differ from our own.  It begins with a discussion that illuminates how empathy can be intentionally nurtured and developed in young people as a part of learning how to be. It doesn’t change by doing more of the same.

As always, be well.

The Space Between Stories

Ace Ladder Aug 14 - 2

Gary Larson – Far Side Gallery 1984

Hi all,

Note: This began as a note to the folks at Modern Learners explaining my lack of presence on our video calls during the past several weeks. It grew! It became a reflection of some big picture issues that I’ve connected to some fascinating experiences I’ve been able to enjoy during the past two month. I’ve included the first paragraph in this piece because I’ll still be sharing it with them.

I wanted to check in and affirm that I haven’t dropped out of the group. Over the course of the past several months, I’ve had the good fortune to be engaged in a number of thought provoking events, not the least of which has been my interactions with the Modern Learners Community. In addition to ongoing reflections connected with the readings, conversations and exchanges that you have made available, the universe appears to have offered me a number of additional challenging and thought provoking experiences.

The first of these was a weekend “gathering” of approximately 200 people who came together to spend time with Charles Eisenstein whose writings and reflection struck a very responsive chord in me. His descriptions of the death of an old story and of our current time as an “Age of Separation” have become a kind of introduction to a body of thinking that has been poking at the edges of my mind for some time.

Charles speaks of the interconnectedness of things and our need for the recognition of this reality. His description of our age as a time of separation from individuals, separation from our institutions, and separation from our planet gave voice to concerns that simmered within me without a name or framework. It has also awakened me to see the increasing number of articles which, although sometimes using different vocabulary, seek to call attention to society of increasing fragmentation, tribalism, and isolation.

Charles speaks of the need to consider a different approach to the change process… an approach which moves away from the exhortation to adopt specific changes to the work of creating spaces where change can occur… not specifically the changes that I would “suggest” but those which come from the hearts of those freed by the opportunity. This spoke powerfully to me as I could easily recall a list as long as my arm of change initiatives which someone thought would be good, which were more or less mandated, and which faded quickly when replaced by the next “good” initiative.

But Charles wasn’t done with me. He offered a path to interconnectedness. He offered the path of empathy. The path of asking, in the face of opposition, “What must it be like to be that other person?” What has their life been like/what is their life like that has brought them to resist what I find so right?

He is best known for his book The More Beautiful World Our Hearts Know Is Possible and for his appearance on Oprah after his publication in 2016 of an essay entitled “The Election: Of Hate, Grief, and a New Story”. His most recent work, Climate, A New Story, is now available.

Not too long (less than a month) after my experience with Charles, I ventured once again to the Hudson Valley for another program… this one a retreat facilitated by Jon Kabat-Zinn and his son, Will. This was a 5-day program in Mindfulness entitled, “The Way to Awareness”.  Kabat-Zinn  is widely recognized as a world leader in the development of mindfulness practices. This was a gift from my wife (which I suspected might have been a thinly veiled suggestion about my somewhat intense focus on fixing the nation’s schools). This program, too, had attracted about 200 or so participants who all seemed to have much clearer senses of purpose for attending than I.

When asked to reflect on our/my purpose for attending I reflected on the impact of a little book given to me by my good friend, Tom Welch. The book written by Clark Aldrich is entitled, Unschooling Rules: 55 Ways to Unlearn What We Know About School and Rediscover Education. In it Aldrich posits that there are really only three types of learning that are critical for our children: learning to learn, learning to do, and learning to be. In visiting, assessing and supporting schools throughout the country for more than 10 years I saw that the third “learning” (learning to be) was largely absent or, at best, only unintentionally developed. I realized that part of my rationale for attending was to see whether or not mindfulness had a place as a way of helping our kids learn how “to be”. As I reflected on this during the next meditation session, I realized that I, too, was struggling with how to be…how to be in a world in which elected leaders seem determined to reject all of the values that I had grown up taking for granted.

Perhaps the most lasting impact of the retreat, though, was the realization that here, just like at “the gathering” with Charles Eisenstein, was a group of people searching for a response to the end of a story. Whether it was Charles offering a vision of a world of interconnectedness… interconnectedness with people and the living world around us… or Kabat-Zinn offering a practice of increased awareness of our actions and their impact, there was a powerful sense of “not aloneness”. It is this “not aloneness” that may be the greatest gift of the Modern Learners Community and others whose work seeks to dismantle separateness and offer connectedness as a better way.

Finally, and from deep in left field, I discovered via Medium, Umair Haque. Haque is listed among the world’s foremost keynote speakers, has written extensively for the Harvard Business Review and has authored a number of books. His primary field of focus has been economics, society, and human development. His essays, both current and archived, are published through Eudaimonia and Co.  His book, Betterness, Economics for Humans, suggests that much like education, we are struggling to unlearn a paradigm that no longer serves us.

And here is the intersection. In describing the business paradigm, Haque unintentionally offers a description of the education paradigm that continues to govern (and limit) the possible. He writes:

“So little have the components of this paradigm changed over the decades, that most of us see them not just external fixtures of the landscape, but as the landscape.”

Assume for a moment that Eisenstein’s concepts of ending stories, an age of separation, interconnectedness, empathy, and the creation of space for change are right-headed. That Kabat-Zinn’s connection of mindfulness practices and the power of collective consciousness leads to increasing awareness of our thoughts and motivations. And that Haque’s thinking about moving beyond outdated (and counterproductive) paradigms is right on. How does the intersection of these thoughts from the world beyond the walls of the school impact what we do for kids?

The old story of education is dead. The old formula of work hard, do well in school, get good grades, score high on the SAT’s/ACT’s, get into a good college, graduate and get a good paying job ensuring a secure future may work for the sons and daughters of the wealthy, but for the majority of working class Americans, it’s dead! We are in a time between stories. We are in a time of writing new stories.

Your Turn…

While it may be beyond our pay grade to write new stories for the economy, for health care, for tax reform, etc., it is we as educators, whether we are school leaders or classroom teachers or district administrators, to create the emotional spaces in our buildings, classrooms, and districts where new stories of learning can be written. Taking a page from Jon Kabat-Zinn, how aware are you of your thoughts about creating safe spaces for change, for new stories? Of your own role in creating such spaces?

Be well.

What Is the Tipping Point?

red and gray seesaw in the playground

Photo by Mike Anderson on Pexels.com

This piece started out as a continuation of an exchange between members of the Modern Learners Community in response to a video clip, “What Is School For?” It’s gone viral and is really worth the look.

As the piece evolved I decided that it went beyond the topic of the thread and decided it might be better to share it here.

Spoiler alert: This is not my usual thoughtful and somewhat measured reflection.  This one is rooted in emotion.  Emotion that stems from our inability to move beyond what we have all learned in and about school.  I was tempted to substitute “unwillingness” for “inability”. But in my career as a teacher, administrator, state department mucky-muck, and consultant, I’ve met too many folks who care deeply about kids to be that casual about the use of language.  But be warned right now. Before the end of this piece I will seriously challenge that caring.

Here’s the exchange that inspired my decision to write this.  It begins mid-thread with my response to a question/comment about change in schools and the video clip linked above. It continues with a response by Bruce Dixon, one of the founders of Modern Learners and a life-long educator who lives in Australia.

Rich…Am I correct in thinking that large scale change in existing schools has occurred largely as a result of the need to implement state mandated (or heavily subsidized) direction/regulations? Pessimist that I am, I see no large scale adoption of Modern Learner principles without significant external pressure.

Bruce…Your last question raises many others Rich. I fear your observation is correct, so maybe the problem isn’t that the majority of educators don’t know that change is needed, but rather do not know, or will not face up to the fact that tweaking is not the answer?

Rich…Bruce, I’m thinking of a variation of your observation.   I think your response touches on something very important.

And so on to the blog…

Educators have had an extensive and highly effective indoctrination/apprenticeship program – at least 16 years of schooling before entering the profession and then x years of reinforcing experience within the system.  This has been an exceptionally effective way to have people internalize the norms and practices of any system.  So what if, based on their experiences, the majority of educators can no more envision the need for substantive change in the system they know than our great grandparents could see the need for anything more than slightly faster horses? At that time, they certainly couldn’t envision that what was needed was a metal box with four wheels and an internal combustion engine.

Is this example so different from teachers and school leaders who don’t can’t (my deliberate substitution of a different word) recognize the need for change or can’t accept that tweaking (making small improvements) isn’t the answer?

How did Henry Ford overcome the resistance to the drastic difference between the status quo and a horseless carriage? Moving closer to contemporary times…how did Sony convince so many of us that we needed a Walkman? How did Apple make it hard to conceive of leaving home without our cell phone?

Relating this to making change happen, I‘m thinking it’s about need creation.  An increasing number of the things we “want” are the direct result of very sophisticated process of need creation. Needs and wants are created and sustained via emotional connections. Advertisers understand this all too well. For example, I’m fearful about my deteriorating memory and Prevagen can remove this fear.  Even knowing the manipulation of my fears, it’s tempting to head out to my local pharmacy.  (At least it was until I just read that the FTC has labeled the advertising a hoax.)

I don’t want to beat this to death.  If the need creation concept resonates, I’m sure we could fill a few pages with additional examples. The key question for me is: How can our experience with need creation through advertising inform us in the development of a movement away from our test and punish culture to one which is focused on kids’ needs and their development as healthy, thoughtful and caring creators of a story that moves us beyond our current time of separation and fragmentation?

I believe that “the reform movement” was a response to need creation.  The need was created through an intentional appeal to fear (see introduction to A Nation At Risk) and the connection between student performance and national security (See also federal response to Sputnik and the emphasis on threats to the nation… NDEA and the focus on math, science, and foreign languages).  NCLB, Race to the Top, ESSA, etc. are simply continuations of the fear-based problem definition/problem solution begun after Sputnik.

Much of the attention on moving away from “schooling” is based on a focus on learning. But if teachers labor in a system which measures, values, and evaluates based on content based goals and expectations, why would we be surprised and/or disappointed with their lack of engagement in yet one more change, program, fix, etc., especially one which asks them to reject most, if not all, of what they have experienced and internalized about what happens in schools?

What if the way to build change momentum lies in a need creation that defines the benefit not in terms of what is/isn’t good for kids, but rather in terms of the impact on a nation’s security and economy? But what about the needs of kids? Yeah, what about them?

As a nation we have consistently demonstrated that we care for kids more in the abstract than in the concrete.  How can I state that?  Here’s how.  We have already demonstrated that, rhetoric to the contrary, we really don’t care that much about kids.  We have cities filled with black and brown kids in poverty. We have kids killed in our streets. We have kids killed in schools. We place children in concentration camps when they or their parents are caught trying to seek refuge in our country. We have a dramatic increase in kids in schools presenting symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression.If we can continue to allow/tolerate such violence being visited on our children, what’s to give us confidence that changing school because it’s good for kids is a likely future?

We in schools didn’t put those kids in poverty. We in schools didn’t kill any kids in school shootings. We in schools didn’t put any kids in concentration camps separated from their parents. But what else didn’t we do?

We in schools didn’t go on strike to force action on school violence.  We in schools didn’t initiate civil actions to protest kids living lives in poverty in the richest country in the world.  We in schools didn’t refuse to make Algebra or Calculus gatekeepers for high school graduation.  We in schools did not force conversations about why our kids are suffering from record incidences of stress, anxiety and depression.

As I write this and rewrite it multiple times, I realize that what we haven’t done as educators reaches far beyond whether we should focus on teaching or learning. It involves revisiting our commitment to our children. It involves supporting the actions of caring teachers, administrators, policy makers and students to do the right thing.  It involves the creation of physical and emotional spaces where each and every adult and child can feel safe, loved, and empowered to discover and be the person they are meant to be.

I’ve been blessed to have the opportunity to work with many caring adults and wonderful young people.  And yet… and yet I realize that I missed so many opportunities to demonstrate that kids matter… so many times I thought of my own or other adult conveniences.  A tipping point for me took place on the boardwalk in Ocean City, NJ at a post-Parkland rally/demonstration where with a small group of friends we gathered along with a few hundred others to support efforts of students to speak about the ravages of the violence they had experienced. As one of the students spoke passionately and eloquently, I was moved to tears.  My wife asked if I was OK.  I nodded and said I had spent much of my life wanting kids to be able to have the confidence and courage to do just what the young lady was doing.  What she said mattered.  She mattered.  In this time of camps and tent cities for separated children, I believe we have to model the confidence, caring and courage to support and inspire our children to rise above such insanity.

Be well.

 

 

 

Elizabeth Merritt Has Seen Our Future… and it doesn’t work

compassAs many of you have been deeply engaged in the process of opening school and avoiding the ever-present fears of a major disaster…. Busses that miss stops, multiple classes scheduled for the same room, last minutes teacher replacements, etc., some of us retired folks have been sitting around, sipping adult beverages and pondering different kinds of school related questions… questions like “What will school look like for the next generation of kids?” “Will it look like it does now?” “Why do we keep doing things that we know don’t work?” “Why the heck do we have school anyway?” “Do we even need a system of public education?” “Is Betsy DeVos real or is she a character created by Monty Python?”

This somewhat lengthy intro is by way of saying that I, too, have been busy.  I’ve been bombarded with thoughts and conversations (both physical and virtual) that I’ll call “compass” musings.  I recall reading someplace a statement by Stephen Covey in which he noted that, as nation, we had confused the value of the clock with that of the compass… that we had created a huge market for planners, Day-Timers, schedulers, etc…. emphasizing/reinforcing the value we attached to how we organize our time while, at the same time, largely ignoring matters of the compass – i.e., are we heading in the right direction, are we on course, what is that course?  He added that when there is no clear destination, anyplace we get to is as good as any other.

The past week, filled as it was with the passing of Senator McCain, highlighted “compass” type question. But regardless of my/our assessment of the direction of our current leadership, it seems clear that it has done one thing very well.  It has begged us to assess/reassess the direction of our nation, its cultural norms, and its values.

So the next few posts will be loosely organized around the compass theme.  As usual they will be a combination of me seeking clarity through writing and the offering of some things for your reflection.

Note: Some parts of these posts have already appeared as responses to discussions that I’ve been involved with as a part of my participation in the Modern Learners Community that I’ve referred to previously.

 In a recent piece entitled Fragmentation, Elizabeth Merritt writing for the American Museum Alliance offers a very stark picture of a potential future.  In her scenario, she offers that, based on the continuation of current trends and direction, the nation’s system of public education will no longer exist.

It was in response to this assertion that I shared the following in the Modern Learners Community forum.

I believe the threat to our system of public education is very real.  I also see it as a part of a larger problem.  As I’ve reflected on this (both as a result of the piece that Will (Richardson) shared and in connection with work we’ve been doing for several years now around redefining the vocabulary that’s become a part of our conversations and policy planning), I find certain words recurring: separation, fragmentation, choice, learning, location, culture, and equity… By the time I’ve finished thinking/writing my thoughts, this list is likely to expand.

Here’s a bit of context as seen through my lens.

– During the past 40+ years we have internalized the notion that our system of education is failing.

– During the latter part of that same timeframe, we have been exposed to (and largely accepted) the notion that taxation is bad. We see a growing number of horror stories evolving which report the deplorable conditions of schools in states which have committed to serious tax reductions (see recent articles reporting the increase in school systems choosing a 4 day school week).  The reduction in resources has affected both urban centers and rural areas.

– This change in willingness to provide resources is in conflict with a system that relies heavily on human resources as its delivery system… producing a predictable growth in costs associated with such human resource dependent systems.  More importantly, this trend of declining resources and increasing costs is not sustainable. It adds credibility to Merritt’s predicted demise of our system of public education.

The recent events in the national political stage have highlighted an additional change in our culture… the increasing sense of separation and the reality of fragmentation by political ideology, race, income level, living conditions, etc.

Let me state my thinking more clearly. This is only partially a school issue.  It applies to our thinking about learning and to something much larger.  This is culture issue.  It is about a change in our culture… a belief in scarcity rather than abundance; a sense that every gain for one is a loss for another; a focus on blame and a belief in the efficacy of punishment as a behavior modification strategy; and, yes, a deeply rooted sense of white supremacy.

Is all of this new? I don’t believe so.  What is new is the confluence of feelings of fragmentation, separation, fear, tribalism that suddenly live (and are accepted) in the light rather than remain hidden as they have been for most of my lifetime.

What is also new, however, is the awakening awareness that this direction does not have a good end… in the learning lives of our children or in the future of our country.

As I’ve reflected on the word culture and its importance both for our land and for our children in their learning I realize that most of the conditions that I see now were there to be seen much earlier.  I was too busy to really notice the changes. I was busy trying to do my best as a parent, as a teacher, as a spouse.  I didn’t pay enough attention.  It wasn’t really affecting me, or so I thought.  I wasn’t looking at the compass.  This process for me is still incomplete.  It is this realization that makes me appreciate even more the good work of the Modern Learners team as they try to help us both find a better compass heading and support our efforts to redirect our work.  Be well

Why am I starting this short series with this piece?

Because I don’t believe my experiences were all that unusual.  I certainly didn’t intend to ignore the inaccurate pictures being painted of our schools.  I certainly didn’t intend to ignore the various hearings on the implementation of NCLB or the later hearing on the implementation of its successor, ESSA.  I didn’t intend to ignore the problems caused for students and teachers by the use of large-scale assessment data as the determiners of student achievement and teacher quality. I didn’t mean to ignore any of these things anymore than I intended to ignore the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama, than I intended to ignore the efforts of the “Freedom Riders” to end the shame and violence of segregation, than I intended to ignore the rise in civilian casualties resulting from our use of high tech weaponry in our “peace actions”,  or than I intended ignore the separation of children from their families as a solution to an immigration crisis.

What are my “take-aways” from this experience?

  • I failed to fully understand the isolating downside of being the master of my own classroom.  By electing to work within a school, I inadvertently enrolled in a culture of isolation and separation that did not encourage collaboration or even discussions with colleagues about our professional practice.  Even more importantly, my isolation within the school extended to a separation, both physically and intellectually, from what was happening around me on a larger scale… in my community, in my state, in my country.
  • Like many of my peers and colleagues I had spent more than 16 years in schools prior to ever setting foot in a school as a teacher.  I had internalized the value of compliance. I had learned compartmentalization.  What happened in the world beyond my classroom and my family was beyond my reach or, embarrassingly, beyond my interest.
  • In each of these instances, I let the tyranny of the clock mask the importance of keeping my eye on the compass and of taking an active role to insure that the heading was correct and clearly being followed.

I don’t know if Elizabeth Merritt is right and if by 2040 we will no longer have a system of free public education for all children.  But as much work as there is to do to move the compass needle away from “education as schooling” to “education as learning”, there is equally important work to be done to write a story in which a system of free public education exists for each and every child in our nation.  I am convinced that to prevent such a loss we must move beyond the isolation of schools and classrooms and become active in engaging our communities in these compass-setting conversations.

Suggestion: Take 10 minutes and list the things that you believe about public education.  Do any of these beliefs seem to be a call to action for you?

Be well.

Kids These Days…

student pic blog mental health 2018-08-19 at 3.17.42 PM

Microcroft Word Clip Art

A while back I wrote a piece about the work being done by psychologist Dr. David Gleason.  In his book, At What Cost: Defending Adolescent Development in Fiercely Competitive Schools,Gleason describes the ways in which schooling contributes to the rise in adolescent mental health issues.  The title of Gleason’s book is misleading.  While his own work focused on interviewing students at highly competitive schools, the studies he cites in his work refer to students in middle and high school years, regardless of their school type. Additionally, the pressures associated with performance on high stakes, large scale assessments have dramatically changed the cultures of many “non-competitive” schools for both students and educators.

Gleason’s work builds on studies which indicate that the rate of anxiety, stress, and depression in our young people has risen dramatically since 2010.  For additional detail about this development (many would accurately use the term “crisis”), check out this article which appeared in the NY Times.

Gleason points to what he called “the bind”… the realization by many parents and educators that the old story of “work hard, get good grades, go to a good college, get a good job and enjoy lifetime security” is no longer applicable for many of our young people.  The “bind” occurs when we recognize that we have no consistent advice to share with our children and our students other than the “old story”.  What do we do?  We know that the old story is dead/dying, but there is no similar consensus about a new story… a new path to share with our kids and students.

In the studies cited by Gleason and detailed in the NY Times piece, the students are included as statistics.  The problem is described and viewed from the perspective of the problem it presents for adults. While certainly not Gleason’s intent, “the bind” reflects a kind a hierarchical thinking that prevails in most schools.  In most instances the employees are engaged in conversations about the students while, with few exceptions, the voices of these “customers” are largely absent.

In today’s post, I wanted to call attention to two pieces of work that offer insight into this threat to our kids as seen by the kids themselvesI was in awe of the eloquence of the student voices following Parkland. I am no less awed by the eloquence of the students as they describe the pressures and the stories of their experiences with navigating a path through an increasingly complex time.

In his new film, Eighth Grade Bo Burnham, adds texture to this complexity though the voice of the most affected by this dilemma, the students themselves. In Eighth Grade, Burnham shares the way this complex story is unfolding for those reflected in the statistics.  In a recent article from the Atlantic which includes an interview with Burnham, “In Middle School, You’re Trying To Build a Parachute While You’re Falling”, Julie Beck describes the dilemma faced by the film’s main character, Kayla.  And here’s a short trailer with Kayla’s own words.

In the film, a 13-year-old girl named Kayla is feeling her way through the dark forest of middle-school social life. On-screen, the scenery keeps changing: How should she act in the classroom? At a popular classmate’s pool party? At the mall with a new group of friends? And is she a totally different person on the internet, in the vlogs she makes in which she offers advice and pep talks? “Being yourself can be hard,” she says, “and it’s like, ‘Aren’t I always being myself?’” Kayla’s sweet and stumbling attempts to answer that question in these different scenarios—in real life and online—are the driving force of the movie.

While Burnham captures the dilemma of increasing complexity faced by kids, a piece in last week’s EdWeek by high school senior, Gabrielle Weber, calls us to action.

Let me give you a bit of a preview of Gabrielle’s insight and I like to urge you to read her piece.  It is both eloquent and touching.  Beyond its eloquence and emotional impact, however, lies a truth that we must confront.  We have allowed the efforts of educational “reformers” to drive our system of public education to a place far removed from what we know in our hearts to be a better place… a place which nurtures the unique talents and needs of each child in our care.

In Gabrielle’s words, …

Achievement is blatantly valued above health. This prioritization instills in students the feeling that we’re not good enough, making it difficult to reach out. In short, it sabotages learning. You know, the thing we go to school for?

…No one advocates for the students struggling to live up to unreasonable standards because that struggle is viewed as ideal. It’s seen as virtuous, when in reality, it’s extremely detrimental.

…In order to solve this problem, schools must prioritize well-being as the fundamental foundation of learning. It should never be a question for kids whether they’ll have someone to turn to when they need it. Expanding supportive staff in schools—including psychologists, counselors, and social workers—would provide the kind of support students both need and deserve. Students with disabilities, disorders, problems at home, and many other disadvantages are particularly affected by the current lack of support in schools. We can do better for them and for our community as a whole. We need to do better.

I urge you to read Gabrielle’ thoughts and her suggestions.  Her work begs us to reflect on some critical questions. Here are a few of mine.  I’d love to hear yours.  This is conversation that we cannot afford to avoid.  Let’s get it started.

Questions:

We often read and/or talk about socio-emotional intelligence as a skill set to be developed in our students. What about the socio-emotional health of our students? Why would students think we place greater importance on academic achievement than on their well-being?  What should we do to change this perception?

Have we moved beyond the times when it is fair to demand that school guidance counselors , regardless of case load, be able to recognize and deal with the emotional needs of students presenting symptoms of significant stress, anxiety, and/or depression?

Is our continued use of chronological age grouping ignoring the research relating to the developmental readiness?   If so what fears keep us from alternative grouping approaches?

Summing it up…

From the NY Times Magazine article referenced at the beginning of this piece…

Over the last decade, anxiety has overtaken depression as the most common reason college students seek counseling services. In its annual survey of students, the American College Health Association found a significant increase — to 62 percent in 2016 from 50 percent in 2011 — of undergraduates reporting “overwhelming anxiety” in the previous year. Surveys that look at symptoms related to anxiety are also telling. In 1985, the Higher Education Research Institute at U.C.L.A. began asking incoming college freshmen if they “felt overwhelmed by all I had to do” during the previous year. In 1985, 18 percent said they did. By 2010, that number had increased to 29 percent. Last year, it surged to 41 percent.

Hardly a day goes by when I don’t receive one or two blogs/newsletters about the importance of school culture.   While the numbers cited above are taken from surveys of college freshmen, the issues did not begin in summer between high school and college.  Last week I watched a PBS show extolling the benefits of kindergarten boot camp.  Burnham, Kayla and Gabrielle are sounding an alarm.  We have created or, at the very least, are participating in a culture of accountability, expectations of high achievement, and fear which research and our hearts are telling us is unhealthy for both adults and children.

Be well.