What risk taking looks like…

Somewhere in the neighborhood of 25 years ago, Eric left the world of business to take a job teaching primary school children.  After distinguishing himself as a truly talented educator, he encountered a district leader who could have served as the poster child for cluelessness.  Thus began the next phase of the young man’s journey along with a chance to prove to himself (and others) that cluelessness and educational leadership did not have to be synonymous.

Fast forward another decade or so and this educator (now a principal and no longer young) lives what Charles Eisenstein describes as the essence of leadership… the commitment to create spaces where change and growth can occur… spaces that are places of trust and safety, places where risk taking and discussions about what matters have become embedded in the culture.

Just recently, Eric was asked to share with his administrative colleagues an administrative innovation that had been implemented in his school.  His presentation focused on the work completed by the school’s faculty to address concerns about improving student reading.  This school regularly outperforms other schools in the district in spite of facing socio-economic challenges greater than any of the comparable schools.

Eric didn’t end his presentation with strategies and commitments made by the members of the school’s community.  Instead, he ended with the following:

****************

While we are on the topic of reporting instructional innovations that lead to greater student achievement, I have some closing thoughts.

My Professional Struggles

Over the last 4 years and I have been struggling with a growing battle within my conscience regarding my professional obligation to our students and my effectiveness as an educator.

The struggle revolves around being forced to do things right, based on NJDOE and Federal DOE requirements, rather than doing the right things for kids.

This has nothing to do with the XXX School District and everything to do with the state of public education in New Jersey and nationally.

Case in Point – A study of my children’s K-12 experience plus 23 years as an elementary educator.

K- 12 Case Study

I watched my kids become increasingly disengaged with their learning in school with every passing grade beginning in 4th grade and extending to 12th. (Gallup 18)

I listened to growing complaints of why are we learning this ridiculous and irrelevant content that has no application to the real world?

 Why aren’t we learning how to learn? Why aren’t we learning how to BE and how to DO in the real world. How come we don’t get to explore what we want to learn at school like we do when we are learning things outside of school. Why do we have to take these tests that make us feel stupid and inept as students and learners?  Tests that turn us off to learning and damage our self-confidence. Why doesn’t school spark our natural desire to learn about our world and how to be confident and productive members socially, emotionally, and academically?

Who would send their children to schools that turn children off to learning?… …Schools that squash students’ natural desire to learn and create an environment of growing disengagement with each passing year?

It is time for us to reimagine our outdated and largely unchanged education system that has been in place for the last 100+ years into a system that provides our students with the following educational conditions for learning:

A safe, positive, environment where every child feels a strong sense of belonging.

Curriculum and programs that are relevant to their lives, have real-world application and provide students choice in learning what they are interested in learning with the purpose of  preparing students how to be and how to do in our world.

 Teachers serving as mentors, K-12, creating challenging, fun, and social learning environments were no student goes unnoticed or unknown as a person.

A place where students naturally become invested and passionate about learning through real-world hands-on lessons that provide student agency in the content they want to explore.

An education with developmentally appropriate expectations, not dictated by politicians or big business textbook companies. A place where students learn to read, write, speak, and explore mathematics, K through 12, at their own pace through cross-curricular project-based learning as opposed to in isolation.

And lets weave human psychology into the curriculum K-12:

So we know how we work psychologically as human beings and can:

  • Better assess who we are deep down, work on our weaknesses, and capitalize on our strengths. 
  • Improve our relationships.
  • Raise our children well, applying what we learn K-12 about a healthy human psyche.
  • Better deal with the growing anxiety problem we face as a society based on the growing feelings of isolationism we are experiencing especially among our youth. (New York Times)
  • Recognize dispositions at an early age for mental illness and addiction to get help early.
  • Provide healthy outlets for ADD and ADHD instead of medication.

And don’t worry about College/University entrance requirements!

For those who have gone through the college/university search process as parents, it is obvious they are just big businesses that will adjust to the redesign of our public school system in America for their own survival.

James Ryan, the former Dean of Harvard Graduate School of Education, charged graduates with exploring the following  essential questions  as they venture into their careers as educators. 

  • Wait! – What? 
  • I wonder what would happen if we …?   I wonder why…?
  • Couldn’t we at least try?
  • How can I help?
  • What matters?
  • Bonus Question…And did you get what you wanted out of life…even so?  

 These questions can help start engaging stakeholders in exploring a shift in our educational system.  If we truly care about our students, change is not an option.

America’s youth deserves to be prepared to live healthy, happy, and prosperous lives taking full advantage of all the amazing opportunities our competitive 21st century America has to offer!

Thank you for providing me a therapeutic opportunity to share the internal ethical battle I face. Having to work at doing things right, instead of doing the right things for our students has become a daily struggle.

Some of the most brilliant, creative people I know did not do well at school. Many of them didn’t really discover what they could do—and who they really were—until they’d left school and recovered from their education. Sir Ken Robinson

  • Will Richardson, Educator,  Author, Founder of Modern Learners
  • Sir Ken Robinson, Professor and Author
  • James Ryan, President UVA
  • Simon Sinek – Leadership Professor and Consultant, Columbia University
  • Rich Ten Eyck, Educator, Professor, Leadership Consultant, Founder of Rethinking Learning
  • Gallup Education
  • Institute of Progressive Education and Learning
  • Peter Drucker, Educator and Author / Russell Ackoff, Professor
  • New York Times
  • Tech and Learning

Full disclosure: When I was but a lad in our local parish elementary school, we were regularly encouraged to consider the possibility that we may have been called to serve.  This was referred to as a “vocation” or calling.  In 6th grade I could spell the word but had no real idea of what it meant.  Later in life I grew to understand that people are “called” to different things.  Many of them understood that their calling meant that they really couldn’t do anything else… they were driven by that call. As a school/district leader I realized that many of the people with whom I worked were genuinely “called” to work with children.  They didn’t have jobs.  They had vocations.

I had the good fortune to work with Eric.  I hope that by allowing me to share his words (he hasn’t seen this disclosure), Eric’s kindness, courage, and commitment will reinforce you in your calling.

Closing thoughts

We began this century with a flood of articles, discussions, initiatives, etc. about 21st Century Skills.  If we look at the data detailing the frightening increase in kids reporting their struggles with anxiety, stress, and depression, it appears we either misidentified the necessary skills or bungled their delivery.

What if we’ve overlooked the learning that was/is most necessary for our children to cope with 21st Century Challenges… the challenges of their increased separation in spite of huge increases in social media participation, the challenges of preparing for jobs that change almost daily and, most critically, the challenges of defining who they want to be?

What if the skills that are needed are not more stringent/challenging standards in American Literature or Honors Biology or Algebra II?

What if the skill that’s needed is not a 21st Century Skill at all, but one that’s been necessary for as long as we have inhabited the planet?

What if the critical skill is simply learning how to be? What if that’s what matters?

I wonder what the education of our kids would look like and be like if we built our policies, practices and procedures around Eric’s thinking and doing the right thing.

What would happen if we tried?

How can we help one another?

Be well.

2 thoughts on “What risk taking looks like…

  1. Great article… I sent it to my son so he might consider the message for my 6 year ols grandson. Thanks for the rich (no pun intended) content.

    Like

    • Thanks for the comment. As much as I’d like to deny it, I get an endorphin rush when I see comments. This post was especially meaningful to me. After I left Little Egg I would hear comments from people in town and in the district about how great things were when I was there. Nice things to hear. In reliving some of the times there as superintendent, it occurred to me that what made any success possible was the receptivity and hard work of a number of folks. Several of these folks (including Eric) had left to take administrative jobs. I found that I needed to say “thank you” for what they did to make some very special things happen so I decided to personally thanks them and offer an ear to listen when they might need to express their struggles, their insecurities, etc. I’ve been meeting with 4 of these folks for the past few years. Even among these folks, Eric is special. He shared his powerpoint presentation that he was to share with the district’s administrative team (which, although in much more charitable terms, Eric has described as focused more on management and compliance than on leadership). It touched me and I asked if he would mind if I shared it. Hope you have a healthy and stimulating new year. Be well. Rich

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s